Quote

There are people who think New York is an irrelevant market,” Mr. Sanwal said. “The more intellectually honest answer is that New York is just relatively immature. It’s on a good path and it needs to run its course a bit more.

“Despite Big Ambitions, New York’s Tech Scene Is Still Starting Up” via NYTimes

I’m still a relatively newbie to the NYC tech scene but I’ve already started to appreciate the density and diversity of the companies here. I agree the city is still immature compared to Silicon Valley. However, being a tech business here in NYC gives you amazing access to hundreds of incredible companies who are *not* tech shops, which is a big win for enterprise-focused startups (IMO).

Quote

But this isn’t any run-of-the-mill Bitcoin address; It combines the three users’ public encryption keys, created based on a private encryption key generated when they installed DarkMarket, to offer what’s known as a “multisignature” address.

“Inside DarkMarket: a Silk Road the FBI can’t touch” via Wired

I find it amazing to hear how sophisticated these dark networks are becoming (regardless of the fact that I don’t support what actually gets bought and sold in them). 

Quote

Enterprise software sucks.

We don’t talk about it much here at hn, but think about it. Every man-made object you encounter every day was manufactured somewhere. And moved, more than once. Now add in all the sales, marketing, customer service, operations, accounting, finance, human resources, etc., etc., etc. needed to support that manufacturing and distribution. Next, add financial markets, healthcare, energy, entertainment, etc., etc., etc. and you have tons of stuff. But you don’t see it and rarely think about it. Kinda like most of the iceberg being underwater.

And all of this needs software. And most of what they have sucks. I mean really sucks. Enterprise software is so bad that there are multi-billion dollar industries devoted to consulting on how to use it, how to share it, and how to store it in data warehouses and harvest it. It’s so bad that lots of people have to dump the data out of their enterprise systems and into Microsoft Excel just to get anything done.

When Willie Sutton was asked why he robbed banks, he said because that’s where the money is.

What banks were in the 1930’s, enterprise IT is in the 21st century.

via Hacker News

In our ongoing theme around the challenges of enterprise tech (to put it mildly), we found this classic thread from Hacker News from a few years back.  Guess what?  Nothing much as changed.

At Enhatch, we are doing our very best to rethink the way business apps get created and deployed to users.  For one, we believe most needs in the enterprise could easily be handled by elegantly crafted apps that are available on mobile devices.  That is where employees are spending more and more of their day doing work and the device they are most comfortable with.  But more importantly, why are we not giving business users the ability to create their own apps and their own processes that conform to the way they work?  Maybe users, and not IT department or outside consultants, know best as to what they want and when they need it and how to get it done.

It is time we rob the enterprise IT vendors and raid the armies of the systems integrators, and like Robin Hood bring joy, riches, and freedom to the users from the tyranny of bad technology.

(via enhatch)

Link

Consider this your official heads up about these cool notification apps.

I also really need to stop UI-hacking my Android but it’s just so much damn fun. New toy: I found a widget program that let’s you write your own little apps on the device using a custom language to access all the system data. Amazing. Reminds me of when I used to compete in ResExcellence contests for having the most mod’ed Mac OS.

11 Android Apps to Make Notifications More Interesting